Sprite Reinforces ‘Clear Hai’ In New Commercial

Sprite's new ad shows a young guy using his wit in a considerate manner by helping out two elderly women get a parking spot

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While the weather is getting warmer, beverage brands are bracing up our minds with new commercials. In the latest TVC by Sprite, the lemon flavoured cold drink from Coca Cola has weaved in a twist to its classic brand proposition, ‘Clear Hai’.

Conceptualized by Ogilvy & Mather, the new commercial shows a young guy using his wit in a considerate manner by helping out two elderly women get a parking spot. Of course, he takes a sip from his Sprite bottle before making his plan.

The 50-second ad begins with two elderly women in a car trying to find an empty parking spot. Just as they find one and are about to park, they are overtaken by the driver of another car who speeds into the spot quickly. Witnessing this wrongful act is a guy in a trio of youngsters, who sets about to do the right thing. Taking a sip from his Sprite bottle, he gets his mind cleared and tricks the driver into forgoing that parking spot. Watch the ad to see how he does it:

The ad has been shared on social media platforms including Facebook and Twitter, but not much has been done to engage the community. Sprite has a global page for both Facebook and Twitter, with around 16 million fans on its Facebook page and 112K followers on Twitter. The brand has been creating conversations on social media around the hashtag #ClearHai.

It is good to see the focus shift towards the considerate side of generation Y, a generation that has been perceived as lazy, careless and irresponsible along with being fun loving and adventurous. In a recent changemaker campaign “B For Change”, youth channel Bindass has captured this very perception of the youth and turned it upside down by portraying their considerate side and the positive impact it has made.

While last year was about youth being impulsive, impatient, restless and raring to go, this year the trend is to portray them as responsible enablers of change. What are your thoughts?