419 Million Mobile Ad Blockers Around The Globe, Facebook Set To Foster Popularity Of Branded Content

Global digital news - PageFair released a new mobile ad blocking report that asserts there are now roughly 419 million mobile ad blockers, Facebook said it would allow publishers to include branded content in their Instant Articles posts, and more

Adblocking_Publishers

BMW Innovation: BMW in the UK is celebrating the 100 year anniversary with BMW Innovation, a series of striking press adverts that demonstrate the innovative technology available within the range of cars. In an unusual departure from traditional car advertising, the press adverts do not feature a car at all; instead, a road is seen from the perspective of the driver, set in three dramatic landscapes.

One month in: What CNN has learned from Facebook Messenger bots: CNN has high hopes for Facebook Messenger bots. “Our vision is to be the worldwide leader in mobile and video news storytelling. Messaging apps are in many ways as important a growth platform as mobile has been,” said CNN svp and chief product officer Alex Wellen.

Publishers’ Facebook videos are shared 7 times more than links: Publishers are cramming more video onto their Facebook pages as the platform rewards them in the form of exposure and in some cases, even financial incentives. A look at the data makes it easy to see why publishers are addicted to the format: they get much higher engagement on video posts than they do on article links.

Ad blocking users more than double in a year to almost 420 million globally: In August last year, Adobe and PageFair reported that the global number of ad blocking users had grown from 21 million in 2009 to just under 200 million in mid-2015. Earlier today PageFair (and Priori Data) released a new mobile ad blocking report that asserts there are now roughly 419 million mobile ad blockers around the globe.

Katy Perry’s Twitter account, the platform’s most followed, got hacked: Many of Katy Perry’s 89 million Twitter followers—the most on the platform—were probably intrigued and confused when the pop star tweeted supposed archnemesis Taylor Swift this morning. As it turns out, that tweet—along with several others that were filled with profanity and slurs—was the work of a hacker and quickly deleted.

Iran forces messaging apps to move data to Iranian servers: Companies behind popular messaging apps have a year to move all the data they have on Iranian users onto servers in Iran, according to Reuters. This raises concerns about privacy. The Iranian government wants to be able to track private and semi-private conversations on messaging apps. Many social networks are already blocked in Iran, but it looks like the government wants even more control.

Facebook set to foster popularity of branded content: At its annual conference, Facebook said it would allow publishers to include branded content in their Instant Articles posts, using a new tag and ad unit as part of broader efforts to encourage more high-quality content of all kinds, especially live video.